for authors

This page contains information useful for accepted authors or that prospective authors might want to consider before submitting their work. If you have any questions or concerns please email matt.anthropozine@gmail.com.

About the Creative Commons Attribution license

Authors will notice that their work is marked with these icons, either at the bottom of a webpage or after the author byline in the pdf.

online:
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

offline:
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You may be wondering, what are these things and what do they mean?

Both of these are different representations of the same thing, the Creative Commons attribution license or CC-BY. They define the licensing of published work.

All content in Anthropozine, online and offline, is published under the CC-BY license. The gist of this is that others are allowed to share your work or use your work in mash-ups without have to ask permission so long as they give you credit for being the original creator. This is an alternative to conventional copyright which does require permission before distributing or making derivatives.

There are some important reasons for choosing this path. In academic publishing creators have traditionally surrendered their copyright to the publisher (university, scholarly society, or corporate) in exchange for the benefits of being published such as quality copy editing and XML markup, distribution over an established content, and prestige. Anthropozine offers none of this, instead through CC-BY authors retain possession of their intellectual property. Since our creators are undergraduates they may want to use their work for self-promotion on personal webpages, or reversion them in graduate school applications or future publications. All of this can be done without having to ask permission because CC-BY puts creators in control of their own work.

There is no need for authors sign a contract because CC-BY is automatic, nor is this an informal arrangement or “Gentlemen’s agreement.” Creative Commons is a well established and globally recognized license that is instantly recognizable to users through its trademark icon, machine readable (and thus recognizable to computers), and built on a solid legal foundation (and thus unambiguous to lawyers).